Jenbenbry's Blog

Quilting in the Windy City

Quilts for Kids March 19, 2010

Filed under: Quilts in Progress — jenbenbry @ 12:26 am
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Quilts for Kids distributes quilts to kids in need — whether they be in hospitals or shelters — around the country. They supply the fabric and suggested pattern for a small-ish quilt (36-40″ x 45-46″), you supply the batting. They also encourage volunteers to contribute an additional quilt of their own to “double the number of children we are able to wrap quilts around.”

The quilt supplies for my two quilts for kids arrived while I was in Columbus! Here’s what came in the package – enough pre-cut fabric for two baby quilts and a label, with directions on making a simple quilt.

Fabrics for the Quilt

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Flannel Baby Quilts March 15, 2010

Filed under: Finished Quilts,Quilting Tips for Beginners — jenbenbry @ 12:52 pm
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I created two baby quilts for newborns coming in to the family, both born in January 2010 (Olivia and Asher). I chose bright patterns with predominant hues in pink, blue, green, yellow, and violet with trim and a backing in a pretty striped flannel. I used a very simple square pattern, with the colors running diagonally across the quilt. During this quilting project I learned about the importance of correctly lining up the bias tape.

When you attach the bias binding, you sew once on the top of the quilt and once on the underside of the quilt. It took me a little time and playing around with fabric before I understood how it works, but basically you fold a 3-4 inch strip of fabric in half (with undersides together) and iron it along the long axis. Then you lay the fabric across the edge of the quilt, overlapping with the quilt front, with lined up edges. The edge of the bias tape along the edge of the quilt should be the open edge. Now, you sew a seam all the way down this edge. Next, you fold the bias fabric around to the back and sew another seam (theoretically in the same place as the first). And that’s the rub, if you sew the second seam too far in it shows up on your quilt top, but if you don’t sew it far enough in, the original seam shows on the back of the quilt. I’m working on finding that balance where neither seam shows, but I haven’t gotten there yet.

Here’s a picture of Olivia snuggling on top of her new blanket 🙂